Rare blue lobster moves into S.E.A. Aquarium

Our new resident at S.E.A. Aquarium is a beautiful, genetic rarity that occurs only one in two million – the American blue lobster.

This blue lobster was a gift from our partner aquarium in the USA – Mystic Aquarium, as part of a collaborative effort to exhibit new and unique species for conservation awareness.

American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
15 April 2016 at Mystic Aquarium, Connecticut, USA. The blue lobster was placed inside a climate-controlled chest in preparation for its 40-hour journey to S.E.A. Aquarium. Temperature was maintained at around 3 degrees Celsius to keep the blue lobster in a naturally hibernative state. The box was layered with moistened paper to provide moisture and cushioning during the journey. Lobsters can breathe air and stay out of water for a few days as long as their gills are kept damp and cool.
American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
17 April 2016, 9am at S.E.A. Aquarium, Singapore. The blue lobster finally arrived. Curator Aaron Brett (left) and senior aquarist Jason Lim (right) immediately began acclimatization. Acclimatization is the process in which an organism adjusts to a gradual change in its environment (such as a change in temperature, humidity or pH), allowing it to get accustomed to and thrive in its new environment.
American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
Aaron filling the empty acclimatization tank with water from the blue lobster’s new habitat in preparation to raise its body temperature from 3 degrees Celsius (climate-controlled chest) to about 11 degrees Celsius (new habitat). Being a cold-blooded animal, the blue lobster is unable to regulate its own body temperature and is solely dependent on the ambient temperature.
American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
As the blue lobster was gradually lowered into the partially filled acclimatization tank, Aaron turned it upside down and rocked it gently. This was to remove the air trapped on the inside of the lobster’s gill chamber. The trapped air may come into contact with its gills and in turn inhibit respiration.
American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
After about 60 minutes in the acclimatization tank, Aaron and Jason gently placed it in a carrier before moving it over to its new habitat.
American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
The blue lobster remained in the carrier which is now partially submerged in its new habitat. Jason and Aaron checking water parameters and waiting for the water temperature to reach 11 degrees Celsius. Lobsters are very sensitive to changes in water conditions such as temperature, pH, and salinity.
American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
Final check on the water parameters and the blue lobster is ready to be placed inside its new habitat.
American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
The blue lobster making itself comfortable in its new home at S.E.A. Aquarium.
American blue lobster at S.E.A. Aquarium
The rocks and sand in its new habitat replicate the seabed environment in the ocean of New England, USA. Crevices are intentionally created as lobsters like to retreat into the nooks and crannies of rock and reef structures.

Check out how our blue lobster is doing in this video.

The American blue lobster can be found in its new habitat near the Coral Garden at S.E.A. Aquarium. Check out these 8 mind-boggling facts about them.

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